Tag Archives: essential oils

Crystals and Astrology

In traditional lore the healing qualities of minerals, or the healing crystals, generally remain subjective. Yet as the symbolic meaning of the crystals became part of the collective unconscious, their psychological or psychic qualities were thought to have an effect on our mind and body. As a crystal healer myself the gemstones are my everyday must-haves. I use them for daily healing and depends on the planetary ruler of the day and my need I carry associated crystals, most of the time I wear them in form of pendant or bracelets. I also use crystals to cleanse the aura of myself and space around me. In the past I perform crystal healing therapy on my clients, usually I would perform chakra clearing / balancing. Now I have spent more time on essential oils and tarot readings. Still crystals are always a part of me and they come in very handy whenever I need an extra boost of mojo to amplify sending positive energies to someone.

There is a direct link between crystals and astrology, since the Sun, Moon and Stars, as well as the Earth are all rocks. Crystals are also called the indigo children of heaven and earth. One reason attributable to the mineral facilities of healing is their ability to transmit and absorb light from the Sun. One interesting fact I learned is that there is a very potent link between human beings, the Earth and the Sun. The Earth’s equator inclines 23 ½ degrees towards the Sun in its orbit around the solar disc; this reflects the same inclination of the human heart towards the left side of the body also at 23 ½ degrees. Our human design is not coincidence. There is a direct link with the Sun, the Earth and the human heart. In astrology the Sun is associated with the heart. Such glimpse of knowledge of the divine plan humbles me.

The colours of the crystals. The variance of colour depends upon absorption and transmission of light bringing them beauty and radiance. The geometry of the crystals defines the metaphysical properties of the individual piece. Planetary rulership of plants and crystals serves as a guide for selection, and ultimately choice must always rest with the intuitive understanding of the astrologer.

My interests are in the mineral kingdom (crystals), the plant kingdom (essential oils) and the kingdom of the soul (astrology and the metaphysics). All of them correspond to each other, with lifetime study I want to become a better holistic healer to heal people’s mind, body and spirit.

On the Therapeutic Properties of Jasminum officinale: a literature review

Jasmine is one of the most expensive essential oils, and has been coined as the “King of Aromatics”[1]. The Chinese called them ‘mo li’ and very often they used them for scenting tea.  Jasminum officinale belong to the plant family of Oleaceae.   They are cultivated in France, Italy, Morocco, Egypt and India.  The oils are extracted by volatile solvents.  The scent is intensely sweet and floral.  Their chemical constituents are characterised by mostly esters (benzyl acetate, benzyl benzoate) and alcohols (linalol and phytols)[2].

 Figure 1. Caddy’s Colour Profile on Jasminum officinale

 

General physical actions are relaxing and euphoric.  According to Nicholas Culpeper, it ‘warms the womb…and facilitates the birth; it is useful for cough, difficulty in breathing, etc.  It disperses crude humours, and is good for catarrhous constitutions, but not for the hot’.   In Avicenna’s Canon of Medicine, Jasminum officinale are known as an anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug, that when administered locally, can be effective to painful skin disease, acute mastitis (in pregnancy), earache, ophthalmitis, eye tumour, uterine pain, gastroenteritis and painful sores in the anal area.  The jasmine essential oil, due to its chemical constituents, is sedative, anticonvulsant, decongestant, uterine tonic, oestrogenic, analgesic, antiseptic and cicatrisant.  On the emotional level, it is anti-depressant, and produces a feeling of optimism, confidence and euphoria.   It is most useful in the cases where there is apathy, listlessness and low libido.  Too high dosage may cause headaches and nausea.  It is advised to be cautious when applying to babies and pregnant women[3] .

 

Global burden of infectious diseases caused by bacterial agents is a serious threat to public health.  Antibiotic treatment is a preferred choice to treat bacterial infections.  However, emergence of anti-microbial resistance and toxicity issues augment biological research on the anti-microbial role of plants, due to comparable toxicity and efficacy.  A recent study (Usman Ali Khan et al, 2013) was undertaken to investigate Jasminum officinale for their potential activity against human bacterial pathogens.  It was found that Jasminum officinale demonstrated variable antibacterial activity, with the conclusion that further photochemical analysis of these plants will be helpful for elucidation of novel antibacterial bioactive molecules.

 

Another study in 2015 by Shekhar using 8 varieties of Jasminum (Jasminum officinale inclusive) showed that all of them have antioxidant capacity, which could support traditional healers to treat various infective diseases. In ethanolic extract it was found that most of the samples showed better antioxidant activity when compared to the standard.

 

Apart from their antioxidant properties, Jasminum species have also been researched for their antiulcer activities. The study conducted by Umamaheswari et al (2006) was aimed at evaluating the antiulcer and antioxidant actives of 70% ethanolic extract of leaves of Jasminum grandiflorum L.  The leaves of this species have a distinction of being used in Indian folk medicine for treating ulcers.  The results suggest that leaves of such Jasminum species possess potential antiulcer activity, which may be attributed to their antioxidant mechanism of actions.

 

Jasminum officinale has been used for a long time in human history.  They contain naturally occurring substances that will continue to have a crucial place in drug discovery.  Current research have confirmed their valuable healing properties including their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antiulcer activities.  It is believed that further investigations may help discover even more benefits for the human nation.

 

 

 

References

 

Ali Khan, U. et al. (2013) Antibacterial Activity of Some Medicinal Plants Against Selected Human Pathogenic Bacteria: European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology, vol 3, no 4: p. 272-274

 

Caddy, R. (1997) Essential Oils in Colour, Amberwood Publishing, England.

 

Culpeper, N. (1998) Culpeper’s Complete Herbal, Wordsworth Reference Series, Amberwood Publishing, England.

 

Hussain, M. et al. (2013) Comparative In vitro study of Antimicrobial Activities of Flower and Whole Plant of Jasminum Officinale Against Some Human Pathogenic Microbes: Journal of Pharmacy and Alternative Medicine, vol 2, no 4: p. 33-43

 

Mahdizadeh, S.; Ghadiri, M.K.; Gporji, A. (2015) Avicenna’s Canon of Medicine: a review of analgesics and anti-inflammatory substances: Avicenna Journal of Phytomedicine, vol 5, no 3: p. 182-202

 

Shekhar, S. and Prasad M.P. (2015) Comparative Analysis of Antioxidant Properties of Jasmine Species by Hydrogen Peroxide Assay: European Journal of Biotechnology and Bioscience, vol 3, no 2: p. 26-29

 

Tisserand, R. (1977) The Art of Aromatherapy, CW Daniel, Saffron Waldend, England.

 

Umamaheswari, M. et al. (2007) Antiulcer and In Vitro Antioxidant Activities of Jasminum Grandiflorum L.: Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol 110: p. 464-460

[1] Tisserand, R. The Art of Aromatherapy 1977, p.237

[2] Caddy, R. Essential Oils in Colour 1997

[3] Ibid.

The Magical Properties of Lavandula Angustifolia

Magical aromatherapy, in one form or another, has been with us from the earliest great civilizations.  It is as old as the moment when a human being first smelled the delicious scent rising from a flower and recognised it as pure energy springing from the almighty Mother Earth.

Our ancesters used the power of fragrant plants to produce specific changes in their lives.  These changes include inducing spiritual connection with God, drawing love, heightening sexual arousal, purifying the body prior to a ritual, healing the sick and guarding againt negative energies.

Well known to the classic Greeks and Romans, lavender was used to perfume bath water and was burned as incense to the deities.  There are 3 common types of lavender all have different therapeutic properties: true lavender (lavandula angustifolia), spike lavender (lavandula latifolia) and lavandin (lavandula hybrida).  My favourite is true lavender grown in the highland in France.  The fragrance is smooth, rich, delicate and subtle.  The French ones have the highest percentage of linalool, and second highest in linalyl acetate, compared to Japan, Australia and Eastern Europe.  Linalyl acetate is a type of esters that is very calming to the nervous system.  It is excellent for scar tissue recovery.  If you have a cut wound,use one drop of true lavender oil and apply directly to it then cover with a bandage tape.  This will heal the would much faster.  Linalool is antiseptic and also antiviral.

Lavandula Angustifolia is ruled by Mercury, it is best applied on a Wednesday.  Mercury is the ruler of intelligence, conscious mind, study, self-improvement, travel and communication.  On top of these significations, lavender has magical influence on health, love and peace.  It is good for calming stormy or uncontrolled emotional state by bringing our feelings under conscious control.  When you inhale the lavender scent (3-5 drops of true lavender essential oils in a diffuser), visualise a picture of success in these areas that make you so joyful.  Send your wish to the univese. In its essence, magical aromatherapy is the process of visualisation, inhalation of the scent of an essential oil, and the programming of personal energy.

May you use it to manifest positive, needed changes in your life.